Tag Archives: Blood Sugar Management

Numbers

My world has become consumed with numbers. A1c, 6.8, glucose rage 100 – 140, danger zone 70 or below, conversely 180 or above. Alarm sets for 12:00 AM, 3:00 AM, 6:00 AM, blood glucose checks every two to three hours, more if needed. Copay amounts, numbers of vials of insulin, amount of units to be dosed to cover carbs to be consumed, but through all these numbers, the most important number, five…..the age of my son who works through these numbers every hour of everyday with me.

Two nights ago, exhausted, my alarm went off at 3:00 AM, i snoozed it and 5 minutes later it went off again. I had checked Carter at midnight, and his blood sugar was 180. He didn’t have any insulin on board, other than his basal insulin and my body tried to convince me to just go back to sleep, that he was fine. My heart and brain knew better, I staggered out of bed and checked him……..45. The race began to save his life, as happens often with this disease.

My flight down the stairs began. I grabbed a juice box, a cup of milk, and some marshmallows, and his glucagon, running back upstairs prepared for anything. Carter started not being responsive to the juice box, I climbed into his bed, and sat him up, shaking, he started to open his eyes. I opened his mouth and squeezed the juice in. He started to respond. A new number became prevalent, 20, the number of minutes I would sit with him to make sure this low is properly corrected.

Carter fell back to sleep, in my arms, and I then sat counting his breaths. It’s never the same scenario, never the same number, never the same correction that works. It always feels like a gamble, shooting in the dark to see what will work this time. I then have this 20 minutes of sitting in the dark of my son’s room to think about the number of times I have called and beg and pleaded with insurance to approve the devices we need in order to keep my son alive, only to be denied.

My mind shifts to the number three, the exact number of weeks until Carter starts school, and will be in the care of teachers who don’t know what his lows look like, what his high blood sugars look like. Ten, the number of minutes it takes me to convince myself that pushing past my fears is the only way to give Carter a normal life in spite of this disease.

It’s all numbers, all the time. Luckily, this time everything worked out OK, after 20 minutes, I re-checked Carter and his blood sugar was 110. I spent the following 10 minutes stopping myself from think of the “what if” scenarios. Left back at one, another hour of sleep lost, but grateful that Carter was safe.

Managing Type 1 Diabetes is all about numbers, and calculations, and math. One wrong calculation can be unbelievably detrimental, and shift the whole day or night. We have become really good with numbers in this house, we have had to. Yet the biggest number that I hope to see grow, is the awareness of those in my life and beyond who will gain a better understanding of what carter goes through in order to survive.

The Pressure of Managing a Type 1 Diabetic

The one thing people never talk about, is the pressure associated with managing a Type 1 Diabetic child. Yes this disease is manageable, yes, there are many devices that allow for better management of a relentless disease, but the underlying responsibility and pressure are forgotten in the fold.

As the parent to a Type 1 Diabetic child, my son’s existence relies on my ability to care for him. Working feverishly to maintain stable blood sugars can feel like a futile effort most days. Not letting a bad day with Diabetes define you, can be even harder.

There have been many nights that I sit and reflect on the day and feel the guilt of things I should have done differently. After all, we have been working at managing this beast called Type 1 Diabetes for over three years now, I should be a pro by now. What I don’t account for is human error, it is so difficult to function at one hundred percent, when working on only a few hours of interrupted sleep.

Type 1 Diabetes robs you of so much, it robs you of joy some days, robs you of sleep, robs you of peace, and piles immense pressure onto an already weakened spirit. Some days it feels like it is crushing you. Yet through the ashes, beneath all this disease robs, it pushes you to view life through a different lens.

Every day, every moment is a gift. We fight every moment of everyday for survival, and for normalcy. Yet, the pressure is still there. When a severe low, or massive high rear their ugly heads, the pressure to stabilize my son can be suffocating.

When I feel completely under attack from the pressure that managing Type 1 ensues, I find that changing the scenery can help. Once I get Carter stabilized I will take the kids out of the house, take them to the park. Getting out in the fresh air, and changing our view has a forgiving effect that helps me feel human again. It can be easy, sitting in the house, feverishly monitoring blood sugars, carb intakes, insulin on board, to forget there is more than survival, there is life to live.

Some days, I have to be forced. Forced to look at the bright side, forced to get out of the house, forced to find the silver lining. These are the days when the pressure can seem like it is too much, where I would pay for a break, but it’s on these days, when once we have found the joy, it is so much more meaningful, because we have had to fight for it.

When You Feel Numb

There are days when you just feel numb. Whether you are new to diagnosis, or like us, have been managing Type 1 Diabetes for the past three years, some days are harder than others.

Carter has been struggling with lows lately, and sickness has once again permeated our home. My oldest daughter is recovering from bronchitis, and I have been working feverishly to keep the virus from attaching itself to Carter, add-on being 11-weeks into my fourth pregnancy and it’s a recipe for ultimate exhaustion.
While making dinner tonight, I heard Carter’s dex receiver beep. It was his low alert, I called him downstairs and asked him to bring me his receiver and come to me in the kitchen so I could help him correct his low. He brought me his receiver, I grabbed a yogurt handed it to him and told him to eat it.

Carter walked out of the kitchen, placed the yogurt on the dining room table, and went back upstairs to play with his sisters, unbeknownst to me. A few minutes later I hear his urgent low alarm sound. I run out of the kitchen, look at his dex, he is now 55. I race upstairs and walk into my daughter’s room and see a dazed Carter sitting on the floor.
I grab him, grab the frosting from his bag and shove it in his mouth. Once he is rising, and has finally hit a number in range, out of pure frustration I yelled at him. I yelled at him for being so irresponsible, for creating an emergency that wasn’t needed, but mostly because he knowingly left me to be the only one caring about his low blood sugar. Eventually Carter understood the error he had made, and promised me he would work harder at following instructions so this doesn’t happen again.

Now that my son is peacefully asleep, with good blood sugars, I am overwhelmed with guilt and sorrow. I understand that my son is only 4-years-old, but by the same token, having been dealing with Type 1 Management for the past three years, he is well aware of what is required to keep him healthy. I am very open with my son with the care we must have to ensure his survival, and what that entails, as well as the ramifications of not following the regime. Not taking care of himself results in a hospital stay at best, at worst it means death.

When Type 1 Diabetes has been dealt, there is no time for games. No time to test the waters, the consequences of playing games is too costly. I can’t be the only one in this house who cares about his health. With Carter starting school in less than six months, he has to obtain an accountability for his care.

He has to grow up fast, it’s unfair, it sucks, but it’s necessary. If I wasn’t preparing him to care for himself without my presence, I wouldn’t be doing my job as a Mom.

So though I feel guilty, though I feel sorrow, I know these feelings are temporary, that tomorrow is a new day, and that with each incident Carter is learning a lesson. He’s learning what my expectations of him are, what he must do to stay healthy, that he is accountable, but most of all, even though there was anger, he knows it is out of immense love for him that I am so serious about his care.

May tomorrow be filled with more feeling, feelings of joy, feelings of love, and less filled with the numb walk of going through the motions of managing Type 1 Diabetes.

Growing with Type 1 Diabetes

Managing Type 1 Diabetes, can be a very lonely existence. Especially when you are managing it for your child. Without being engrossed in the care that is required, it is easy to watch the care being given with judgmental eyes.

People ask me all the time when Carter will grow out of Type 1 Diabetes. When I tell them he won’t they ask me when it will all get easier. The answer to this question, again is it won’t.

It’s difficult to wrap one’s head around the effort that is poured into managing a Type 1 Diabetic, it’s impossible to bring to light all of the variables in one conversation.The majority of the time, days are OK, and manageable. But there are those days where everything changes on a dime and care becomes almost impossible. An uphill battle that feels like you are climbing up the side of a glacier, barefoot.

We are rapidly approaching the time when Carter starts kindergarten. I will have to relinquish control of his care to the team at his school and I am extremely nervous. I am face to face with a mountain that I am not ready to climb. Allowing someone to care for my son, and having the trust in them to make the right decisions, in a moments notice is daunting.

Type 1 Diabetes is not a play by the book disease. It is an illness that changes minute by minute, based on many factors: activity, insulin on-board, excitement, fear, basal rates, growth, being nervous, food, or lack thereof, and the list goes on and on.

This is a milestone that we need to get through, a hurdle that must be traversed, but my heart isn’t ready. Beyond the exhaustion associated with Carter’s care which spans twenty-four hours a day, every day, the preparation for Carter’s entrance to school has me stressed.

I have faith that my son will be adequately cared for, with proper training, I will relinquish control and allow my son to take more accountability for his health.  It is amazing, as I am reminded yet again, how Type 1 Diabetes changes every aspect of life.  One hurdle at a time, that is what is required when managing Type 1 Diabetes.

How Life Changes after Diagnosis

struggleAfter the immediate devastation of a Type 1 Diabetes diagnosis for your child, the ebb and flow of the severity of how life changes after diagnosis is difficult to describe.

On one hand, the diagnosis brings a determination you didn’t know you had.  A determination to enjoy the fullness life has to offer, a thirst for the faith you may have haphazardly thrown on the back burner, a newfound purpose, and all of these are found at the bottom of the hole you are forced to attempt to crawl out of.

As we approach our three-year mark of Carter’s Type 1 Diagnosis this November, I look back and see that I have been through the many stages of grief many, many times.  These days, it’s not really clear what brings the grief stages again.  Maybe it’s the after summer blues, maybe it’s watching your son explain what his insulin pump is to those who stare at the beach or the pool, maybe it’s the built up exhaustion, who knows, but I do know that some season’s suck more than others.

Watching your child grow up, carrying this burden is bittersweet.  I remember standing in the hospital during diagnosis week, and wishing for the day when Carter was able to understand, when he would then be able to  take an active role in his care.  That day has arrived, and it’s more heartbreaking than I anticipated.

Watching your child realize they are different from their peers is hard.  Birthday parties, getting together with their friends, going to the beach, going to the pool, having to constantly interrupt his fun to do a blood check, or correct puts a damper on his fun.

I don’t think the change is a one time event, I believe after a diagnosis of that magnitude, we are ever-changing, always evolving and taking on what comes next.  We are always growing, individually and as a family as it pertains to Carter’s care and management, most often within each moment.  No one day is ever the same, and the worries that each day bring are always different, and changing.

The hardest days for me, are the ones where I can sense Carter is tired of it all.  On those days, my heart breaks just a fraction more.  I would give anything to take this burden from my son.  It affects our whole family, as my daughters are left with a shell of a mother most days.  Lately, exhaustion takes over and I walk through the day an ill tempered zombie.  Always tired, always worrying, always only half present in what is going on as I watch Carter like a hawk.

Will it get better?  Until there is a cure, I don’t think so.  We have decent days, and have fallen into a routine that works for us, but it isn’t void of immense effort and complications.  The frustration and disappointment are too much to bear some days, but we preserver and move on.

My son and daughters, exemplify the forbearance of those who know where this path leads.  We’ve traversed this road more than once, and we know that we come out of these trials stronger.  All in all, I see how their brothers health worries them, especially Ashleigh.

We fall down.  We pick ourselves back up.  We cry, we laugh, we are like any family, we just cling a little closer, because we are faced with the threat of possible loss every minute of everyday.

Advocating for your Type 1 Diabetic Child

IMG_1250The day my son was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes, I became his biggest supporter and his advocate. I was determined to make this seem “normal”, familiar, less invasive than it inevitably was.  Yet advocating for your Type 1 Diabetic child is easier said than done.

Carter was diagnosed when he was 17-months-old, which was bittersweet. On one hand, he was so young that essentially this way of life would be all he knew, yet the terror that invaded me was numbing. He was so small, so fragile, and I didn’t know how to get through this catastrophic event, especially since I knew nothing about Type 1 Diabetes prior to his diagnosis.

I have found, that is the norm, most know not much about the autoimmune disease that affects more and more people each day. Type 1 Diabetes has been on the rise and the reasons as to why, remain a mystery. My personal journey, compelled me to educate when I could, mostly in an effort for my son to grow up in a world that knows more than before about what he carries so bravely each and every day.

Everyday is a new opportunity to educate those around us, those who know us, and especially those who are strangers. I have checked Carter’s blood in aisles in the grocery store, in line at Disneyland, in restaurants, basically anywhere and everywhere it is necessary. I also dose him anywhere and everywhere.

We recently were on vacation, and while waiting for our food, my children had made friends with a boy who was running around the grassy hills, he too was waiting for his meal. The boy was around 5-years-old, sandwiched nicely between Ashleigh’s six-and-a-half-years, and Carter’s four. The kids ran around and played for a good 10 minutes before both tables food arrived.

The boy visited our table often throughout our meal, and happened to be standing right next to Carter when I pulled out the shot of insulin and injected him. The little boy wretched back in panic as I dosed Carter and screamed, “What are you doing!?” I calmly explained that my son was a Type 1 Diabetic, that his body doesn’t make insulin anymore and he needs to inject it to eat and to stay alive. Though still affected, the boy seemed to understand.

Every action is education, my husband pointed out how I scared that little boy and my response was that I wouldn’t hide and shame our son in dealing with his condition. At the end of the day, those around us need to adjust. It can be done, it has to be done. I will never adhere to society and how uncomfortable those around may be, when my son’s life is on the line. THIS is our normal, this is what my son does to live. I am proud of his daily sacrifices to live and each poke, whether it is MDI (Multiple Daily Injections) or his Inset site changes for his pump, is a deceleration of his survival.

I had a brief conversation with the boy’s mother, and she was eager to quickly learn what Type 1 Diabetes meant and we discussed the signs. Small victories, as I advocate for my son. Spreading awareness is the most important tool we have to assist those in understanding this disease. Allowing those to see what our hero’s endure, is the first step in tolerance, a bigger step toward compassion, and an overall guide in breaking the perception that surrounds Type 1 Diabetes.

Be Good to Yourself

Be Good To YourselfIt is so hard, to remember to be good to yourself. It’s hard when you’re a parent, when you’re a spouse, and even harder when you are the parent of a Type 1 Diabetic.

Every move you make, every dose of insulin you give, every blood check, feels like the weight of the world is on you. We want perfection, with a continually imperfect scenario. We want our children to live normal lives, when their very lives are dependent on a regime that is exhausting and all-consuming, at best.

We are harder on ourselves, because as the adult, we should know better, do better, be better. But at the end of the day, the reality is, we are human beings, who through our mistakes, our fumbles, our grief, our heartache, our suffering, and our shortcomings, learn and get better.

Carter sunbathingI love this picture of Carter, it shows him loving life, enjoying the sunlight beating into his skin as he lounges in the water. But for the pump site attached to his tummy, one would never know he was a Type 1 Diabetic. Living with Type 1 Diabetes, proves to my son that he is anything but ordinary, he is extraordinary.

Me and Carter fight for every breath he takes, and through that battle, we have proven more to ourselves. We have proven how much fight we have in us, how brave we are, how tough we are, how we rise to the occasion, how no matter what is thrown at us, we find the solution. Despite everything, we grow.

There is a comfort in our bond, in seeing the trust my son has in me to help him survive, and how much I am able to prove of my love for him through each and every scenario. My son has encountered situations that most adults have never had to deal with. It has given him a confidence and maturity that many strive for but never obtain.

So though I make mistakes, I will be good to myself, because I know I am doing my best. I fight everyday for my son’s health, for his life and I am proud of what my family has grown into, through all of this.