Advocating for your Type 1 Diabetic Child

IMG_1250The day my son was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes, I became his biggest supporter and his advocate. I was determined to make this seem “normal”, familiar, less invasive than it inevitably was.  Yet advocating for your Type 1 Diabetic child is easier said than done.

Carter was diagnosed when he was 17-months-old, which was bittersweet. On one hand, he was so young that essentially this way of life would be all he knew, yet the terror that invaded me was numbing. He was so small, so fragile, and I didn’t know how to get through this catastrophic event, especially since I knew nothing about Type 1 Diabetes prior to his diagnosis.

I have found, that is the norm, most know not much about the autoimmune disease that affects more and more people each day. Type 1 Diabetes has been on the rise and the reasons as to why, remain a mystery. My personal journey, compelled me to educate when I could, mostly in an effort for my son to grow up in a world that knows more than before about what he carries so bravely each and every day.

Everyday is a new opportunity to educate those around us, those who know us, and especially those who are strangers. I have checked Carter’s blood in aisles in the grocery store, in line at Disneyland, in restaurants, basically anywhere and everywhere it is necessary. I also dose him anywhere and everywhere.

We recently were on vacation, and while waiting for our food, my children had made friends with a boy who was running around the grassy hills, he too was waiting for his meal. The boy was around 5-years-old, sandwiched nicely between Ashleigh’s six-and-a-half-years, and Carter’s four. The kids ran around and played for a good 10 minutes before both tables food arrived.

The boy visited our table often throughout our meal, and happened to be standing right next to Carter when I pulled out the shot of insulin and injected him. The little boy wretched back in panic as I dosed Carter and screamed, “What are you doing!?” I calmly explained that my son was a Type 1 Diabetic, that his body doesn’t make insulin anymore and he needs to inject it to eat and to stay alive. Though still affected, the boy seemed to understand.

Every action is education, my husband pointed out how I scared that little boy and my response was that I wouldn’t hide and shame our son in dealing with his condition. At the end of the day, those around us need to adjust. It can be done, it has to be done. I will never adhere to society and how uncomfortable those around may be, when my son’s life is on the line. THIS is our normal, this is what my son does to live. I am proud of his daily sacrifices to live and each poke, whether it is MDI (Multiple Daily Injections) or his Inset site changes for his pump, is a deceleration of his survival.

I had a brief conversation with the boy’s mother, and she was eager to quickly learn what Type 1 Diabetes meant and we discussed the signs. Small victories, as I advocate for my son. Spreading awareness is the most important tool we have to assist those in understanding this disease. Allowing those to see what our hero’s endure, is the first step in tolerance, a bigger step toward compassion, and an overall guide in breaking the perception that surrounds Type 1 Diabetes.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*