Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA)

warning signsDiabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening condition that develops when cells in the body are unable to get the sugar (glucose) they need for energy because there is not enough insulin.

When the sugar cannot get into the cells, it stays in the blood. The kidneys filter some of the sugar from the blood and remove it from the body through urine.

Diabetes is a lifelong companion.  Because the cells cannot receive sugar for energy, the body begins to break down fat and muscle for energy. When this happens, ketones, or fatty acids, are produced and enter the bloodstream, causing the chemical imbalance (metabolic acidosis) called diabetic ketoacidosis.

My mind has been reeling this week, reading the story about Kycie Terry, and seeing the parallel between her initial misdiagnosis and Carter’s.

No child should have to suffer through DKA, especially in this day and age where we have the technology available to us to properly diagnose people, especially children.

I am heartbroken, and in some small way, through the updates, reliving what we went through with Carter to some degree.

I think when you are discharged from the hospital, you are so grateful to be headed home, and when you arrive there you find your path, working relentlessly as survival becomes your way of life, we forget how serious this disease can be, and how quickly everything can turn.

Carter has been battling a small cold for a couple of days now, and last night at 2:00 am he threw up and his blood sugar was 460.  I cried as I waiting for the ketone strip to dry and let me know the current status of Carter’s condition.

In conjunction with the news of Kycie, I realized how fragile everything really is.  DKA is what we fight to avoid, every second of everyday, that and Hypoglycemia.  Yet, the majority of the time the word survival is at the forefront of my mind.

I came to the realization that I don’t want my son growing up thinking he is “surviving”, I want him to live.  Finding the balance between the two can be tricky, especially when you have two monsters on each shoulder.  DKA, or Hypoglycemia.

Some days it feels impossible to find the right balance with Carter’s blood sugars.  Some days end with me feeling helplessly defeated.  But others end with me feeling accomplished, not only at keeping Carter’s blood sugars within range, but that while doing so he also lived a great day.

Knowing the importance of Diabetic Ketoacidosis is irreplaceable, especially if you have a child, or know someone who is exhibiting symptoms.  Knowing what to look for with early diabetes diagnosis can mean the difference between a simple early diagnosis, or a horrible diagnosis accompanied by DKA.

For more information on DKA and Type 1 Diabetes, please visit the JDRF website.

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