Diabetes, and Dealing with Change

Carter - January 2015
Carter – January 2015

Change is rough, and often we are forced into it.  Going through it is always a struggle, and if given the choice most of us would avoid it.  So when it is thrust upon you, how do you deal with it.  Well, poorly at first, I remember the days and nights filled with tears, frustration and otherwise.  I remember combing through what went wrong,  how did my son get an autoimmune disease?

Those feelings get highlighted anytime I share Carter’s diagnosis with anyone new.  Oddly, this is especially true when the audience is of the medical profession.  It made me realize how encapsulated the endocrine system truly is.

The most interesting thing about having a child with Type 1 Diabetes, is that change doesn’t end with diagnosis.  Change comes frequently, and most times with an angry vengeance.  Routine is not a word that is used when speaking of how you manage Type 1 Diabetes.  I find that the majority of the changes we experience lately happen when Carter is sleeping.

When everything is winding down, and night draws in, Diabetes releases the gamut of all its tricks.  This consists of slamming my son into a 46 blood sugar, or throwing him into a 350 blood sugar.  Through exhaustion and sadness we have to be ready at the drop of a hat to change our current process, our sleep schedules (though after diagnosis sleep is almost non-existent).

We have to welcome change, and the majority of the time, the change isn’t good.  It’s more trauma, more sleep deprivation, more frustration, for both the parent and especially diabetic.

Realizing that the change you experience today, may not be the same change you struggle with tomorrow can be daunting, or a relief.  Being able to adapt is one of the most important parts of managing diabetes.  Finding ways to get through each day, some days is your biggest accomplishment.  Realizing that change is imminent and in order to save what ever sanity you have left, you have to learn to roll with it.

 

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